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Replies to regret: accepting our remorse through anime

We each go through life burdened by our own experiences; carrying our guilt like a sack of chains behind us. It clouds our outlook of the future, and is a murky lens through which we perceive the past. How different our lives might have been if only we’d decided on another course of action, or said yes where we might have said no. Regret is something we all must suffer at some stage on this drawn-out journey through life, something that separates us from other species as much our ability to choose and to create. But regret can also stimulate the strength and impetus to instigate change – a common theme in the Summer 2016 season.

Orange, based on Ichigo Takano’s manga of the same name, ditches the science for whimsy in a magic-realism take on time travel. It’s the mark of Naho Takamiya’s character that she wants to rewrite her regrets, not for her own sake but for that of her 16-year-old self. So she writes herself a letter with all the intimacy of a diary entry, sending it ten years into the past. At first the entries are simply signed, either “Do” or “Do not”, as Naho holds the letter from her future self like an existential cheat sheet. But then she reads of her own heartbreak years ahead of schedule. The boy she’s just fallen in love with will pass away in less than a decade. In a vicarious act of nurturing, she hopes she can save her younger self from some of the same shock and grief. But the lesson for her 26-year-old present self is clear. She must learn that there’s no easy fix for her regrets and losses, and time-skipping notes or no, she can’t escape from the burdens of adulthood.

Thoughtful Arata

Looking maudlin in ReLIFE

Part of the power of Orange is in presenting regret not as one choice that bears down on us, but as series of small decisions that steer us towards our present. The combination of these decisions manifests in any number of wasted opportunities or experiences that might only be gleaned years in the future. By rewriting these apparently inconsequential choices, the bigger picture is altered in meaningful ways. It’s also a heartbreaking concept, one which most viewers can easily identify with. How often have you ever wanted to send a letter to your younger self, urging them to take a different course of action?

ReLIFE, based on Yayoiso’s ongoing web manga, on the other hand, ups the ante of the mad science with a pill that can change your outward appearance to your teenage years. It’s part of a new scheme aimed at curbing the surmounting social problem of NEETs (Not in Education, Employment, or Training). The NEET is something of a fixture in anime narratives, either with the shut-in archetype, or sometimes in the whisked-away-to-a-fantasy-land narrative. Arata Kaizaki, however, is a departure from these stereotypes, and is altogether more realistic, nuanced and, what’s more, relatable. Arata might be dressed in a suit and tie, scrambling out the front door and taking the train, but far from the salary man he pretends to be, he’s actually putting on an act in front of his friends. He takes part in the after work rituals of beers and snacks, swapping stories and laughing at lame jokes, but there is something skewed in his disposition.

2 Comments on Replies to regret: accepting our remorse through anime

  1. SaltyPine // July 6, 2016 at 1:20 am // Reply

    deep.

    Liked by 2 people

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